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Homeschooling is Racist. We Must ‘Focus’ Harder, But Don’t Open Schools.

Someone's going to sue the school district, and a judge is going to come up with some harebrained order. Then what will they do? Are LAUSD officials planning to bus minority students to white kids' homes? Or will they argue that they're okay with "separate but equal" facilities, but disparate results based on race?

It looks like schools around the nation are moving toward distance learning for the fall 2020 opening. Even Fulton County, here in Georgia, has doubled back on its plan for an in-person opening, bowing to Atlanta public schools, DeKalb and Gwinnett counties, which went virtual.

Los Angeles Unified School District hasn’t even set a pin in a calendar to look at in-person school. The teachers unions have a powerful say, and teachers don’t want to come in with a classroom full of germy kids and teens who think they’re invincible. I get it.

But it was inevitable in today’s hyper-race-sensitive climate that a report would come out proclaiming virtual education to be racist.

Here’s the lede in the LA Times:

More than 50,000 Black and Latino middle and high school students in Los Angeles did not regularly participate in the school system’s main platform for virtual classrooms after campuses closed in March, a reflection of the deep disparities faced by students of color amid the COVID-19 pandemic and of the difficulties ahead as L.A. Unified prepares for continued online learning.

The study clearly showed that black and hispanic students participated less at the middle and high school level during home instruction.

“Long before the pandemic, California faced an epidemic of educational inequality,” said Elisha Smith Arrillaga, executive director of the Education Trust-West, an Oakland-based research and advocacy organization. “School closures and distance learning have exacerbated those gaps, especially for students of color and students from lower-income communities.”

“We must urgently focus on solving the participation gaps we see in this report,” she added.

Okay, I agree. But how? Nobody has an answer. School Board President Richard Vladovic said “I don’t have a magic bullet on that, but we all have to focus on it.”

There’s talk of tutoring and “safety nets.” Let me ask a simple question here: How do you provide tutoring to kids who aren’t interested in participating online during a pandemic? If teachers aren’t wanting to come to a school that’s sanitized every day (or few hours), how is anyone going to go to someone’s home?

Someone’s going to sue the school district, and a judge is going to come up with some harebrained order. Then what will they do? Are LAUSD officials planning to bus minority students to white kids’ homes? Or will they argue that they’re okay with “separate but equal” facilities, but disparate results based on race?

Or maybe they’ll just force white and Asian kids to participate less, to make thing equal.

You know, the easiest solution is just to open the schools, mandate masks, hand cleaning, sanitization, and social distancing. But the teachers unions don’t want that. So we will wring hands and “focus” on solutions that don’t really exist to problems that were avoidable in the first place.

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