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Cory Booker Accidentally Spills the Beans on Democrat Policy Failures

He says that America is no longer the best place to achieve the American dream.

In case you missed it—and, honestly, I wouldn’t be surprised if anyone did—Cory Booker, the failed drama king turned New Jersey Senator, is seeking the Democrat nomination for president, which basically means he is traveling hither and yon seeking venues in which to bash the country as a dystopian hellscape where opportunity has fled like the rebels at the end of The Last Jedi. The irony that he is doing so at a time when more Americans are actually working than ever before seems lost on him, however, proving yet again that satire is not only dead and buried, but that reality is happily doing the French Mistake all over its grave.

Case in point: Booker recently made an appearance on the podcast “Pitchfork Economics,” during which he took a break from spinning tales about his imaginary childhood friend T-Bone and lamented the state of the American Dream in Donald Trump’s America. Left unmentioned was the state of that dream in Barack Obama’s America, with its endless recovery summers and record numbers of people on food stamps—what Democrats refer to as “the good old days”—but that’s not important right now. What really matters is just how far out of reach the American dream is, now that almost anyone who wants a job can find one and people have more money to spend.

Or, as Booker himself puts it:

The senator contrasted the conditions in America today with those in the 1930s, a time known as “the Great Depression,” when his father was born.

“Even if you were a black guy like my dad and you were going to pick a country to be born in, the United States would be at the top of your list because we were expanding middle class at a rate that was creating opportunity,” Booker said.

Not much to nitpick there—although I would add that in spite of the hard economic times of the Great Depression, the state of the American family was strong, as were the institutions of community and church that supported it. In the decdes since, however, those same institutions have been largely hollowed out—in large part due to social policy advanced by Democrats.

But never mind that. Booker goes on to say:

The United States of America is not gonna be, necessarily if you’re just looking to get out of poverty, that’s your only metric, this is not necessarily the top country if you’re going to be born poor to get out. And that’s actually an assault on the very idea of the American dream.

I think we need to be the party of reclaiming the dream. We need to be the party of reimagining what this nation– to create great pathways  of prosperity and this is just one of those bills that my team and I are sitting down and thinking, “Okay. How is this being rigged? How are the rules changed? How can we address those changes?”

Let’s just take at face value that what Booker says here is true. How exactly did this “thing” get “rigged” over the years? Well, consider that there are three major rules that, if followed, not only tend to elevate people out of poverty, they keep people from falling back into it:

  • Graduate from high school.
  • Get married.
  • Don’t have children until you’re married.

How exactly have the policies advanced by Cory Booker’s Democrat Party encouraged people to play by those rules? Is it by turning the public education system into a wholly owned subsidiary of the teacher’s unions, while forcing children in disadvantaged circumstances to remain trapped in failing schools where they can’t learn? Or is it by attacking and undermining traditional marriage, disparaging it as a tool of an oppressive patriarchy designed to keep women subservient? Or could it be the social welfare system that was supposedly designed to assist our most vulnerable citizens, but instead made them wards of the state and incentivized single parenthood?

I’d be really interested in hearing Booker’s answers to those questions. In the meanwhile, I’ll be content with offering him a shout-out for inadvertently shining a light on the policy failures of his party. If he really wants to know who rigged the game against regular Americans, at least he won’t have to look far.

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