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Some Georgia Republicans Want to Tax Netflix and iTunes

This seems to some like a good idea.. Some Republicans from rural areas in Georgia want to tax internet streaming services like Netflix, iTunes, Hulu, and even Kindle and video game console downloads. Why? They want to use the money to pay for broadband infrastructure in rural areas.

But pay attention to key words used.

Georgia lawmakers, coaxed by dozens of lobbyists swarming the state Capitol, are pushing for a tax on digital video, books, music and video games.

Which lobbyists?

Nearly 60 lobbyists for cable, TV and cellphone companies are making an argument that it’s only fair that every service be taxed equally.

These are the companies that would build out the infrastructure. So they’re lobbying the government to raise taxes on the internet companies that use their pipes and will then shake down the government for that money to build out more infrastructure.

In other words, this is a way for internet service providers to raise your monthly bill by blaming the government. The companies will wind up with the money, but they’ll be able to blame the government for it.

Sounds like the Republicans should keep away from this bad idea.

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