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Elizabeth Warren Might Have a Point About 2020

So let me go ahead and stake my ground clearly, from the onset:

I am not now, nor do I perceive any situation in the future that would lead me to endorse the candidacy of Senator Elizabeth Warren for president in 2020.

With that out of the way, I have to say, she might have a point.

On Saturday, Warren announced her intent to run for the nomination as the Democrat’s opponent to take on Donald Trump in 2020. It wasn’t that big of a surprise.

Given what we’ve seen since 2016, we can expect pretty much all Democrats to run on several things: pushing a socialist agenda and opposing Trump on “moral” grounds.

The eventual nominee will be whoever comes off as most socialist and has the biggest megaphone to decry Trump’s lack of morality.

For the liberals rifling through their neighbors’ pockets, trying to get everything free they can, that will suit them, just fine.

Reading the tea leaves of the 2018 midterm election, Warren began her announcement speech by appealing to the downtrodden masses.

During her kickoff speech, Warren, a consumer protection advocate and former Harvard Law School professor, attacked Trump as being part of a “rigged system that props up the rich and the powerful and kicks dirt on everyone else.”

For those wondering, Warren’s net worth is somewhere in the range of $5 million to $15 million, depending on who you ask. She recently received a $300,000 book advance, and is listed as the 24th most wealthy member of the Senate.

Yeah. She’s not the richest, but she’s not hurting, either.

So while Warren puts on that bit of political theater in a 10-day tour of the early presidential primary states, including California and Georgia, I have to focus on something else she said, in order to point out that she may be on to something.

“Every day there is a racist tweet, a hateful tweet — something really dark and ugly,” Warren said during a campaign event in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. “What are we as candidates, as activists, as the press going to do about it? We’re going to chase after those every day?”

Well, that much I won’t agree with. It’s not something racist every day.

You can point to something incredibly idiotic every day. You can point to something hateful or mean-spirited most days, but we’ve become a little too quick to call something “racist” in order to drive some desired narrative.

Then, there’s this:

She added: “Here’s what bothers me. By the time we get to 2020, Donald Trump may not even be president. In fact, he may not even be a free person.”

She’s got a point.

There are about 17 Trump-related investigations currently ongoing. Axios gave a rundown of the scandal back in December 2018.

Investigations by special counsel Robert Mueller:

Russian government’s election attack (the Internet Research Agency and GRU indictments) 

WikiLeaks

Middle Eastern influence: Potentially the biggest unseen aspect of Mueller’s investigation is his year-long pursuit of Middle Eastern influence targeting the Trump campaign.

Paul Manafort’s activity

Trump Tower Moscow project

Other campaign and transition contacts with Russia

Obstruction of justice

Investigations by the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York:

Campaign conspiracy and Trump Organization finances

Inauguration funding

Trump super PAC funding

Foreign lobbying

Investigations by the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia:

Maria Butina and the NRA

Investigations by the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia:

Elena Alekseevna Khusyaynova, the alleged chief accountant of the Internet Research Agency who was indicted separately earlier this fall, charged with activity that went above and beyond the 2016 campaign. Why she was prosecuted separately remains a mystery.

Turkish influence: Michael Flynn’s plea agreement includes some details of the case, and he is cooperating with investigators.

Investigations by New York City, New York State and other state attorneys general:

Tax case: In the wake of an N.Y. Times investigation that found Trump had benefited from more than $400 million in tax schemes, city officials said they were investigating Trump’s tax payments, as did the New York State Tax Department. 

The Trump Foundation

Emoluments lawsuit: The attorneys general for Maryland and D.C. sent out subpoenas earlier this month for Trump Organization and hotel financial records relating to their lawsuit that the president is in breach of the “Emoluments Clause” of the Constitution, which appears to prohibit the president from accepting payments from foreign powers while in office.

And there’s a mystery investigation from an unknown office:

Redacted Case #2: A second, redacted Flynn investigation could be one of the other investigations mentioned here. It could also represent another as-yet-unknown unfolding criminal case or could be a counterintelligence investigation that will never become public. 

And let’s not overlook the fact that Democrats, who now have control of the House, plan on reopening their Russia probe, as well as aggressively going after Trump’s tax returns.

With all this going on, it’s hard to imagine that Donald Trump walks away, completely unscathed. At some point, his contemptible, corrupt past is going to catch up with him.

This is the reason conscientious Americans need to apply principles when giving someone the sacred trust of their vote.

In 2016, I found both candidates loathsome, corrupt, and morally unworthy of my support.

It’s not that I am such a perfect person. I screw up, every day. It is, however, as I’ve attempted to point out on so many occasions. There is a moral litmus test for those who aspire to seats of power. It is necessary, because if someone is horrible as a private citizen, they do not suddenly become moral or just when given the reins of power. It only amplifies their worst impulses.

Hillary Clinton is off the table and no longer an issue, thank God.

Trump, however, did not get better. He has not grown into his job. He has not proven me wrong or pleasantly surprised me.

He’s every bit the trollish, inept, dirty mountebank I’ve said he was from day one.

His stain continues to permeate the Republican party, and it will be indelible.

For all the regrets I have in my life, withholding support from Trump will not be one of them.

So while I find Elizabeth Warren to be another rich Democrat, pandering to those she wouldn’t allow into her home, unless it was through the servants entrance, and otherwise laughably out of touch with the realities of middle America, she’s not wrong to consider it may not be Democrat X versus Donald Trump in 2020.

It could very well be Democrat X versus Mike Pence.

This is providing the unnervingly servile Pence doesn’t fling himself down a flight of subway stairs, in the event of Trump’s removal.

The GOP must suspect the danger Trump is in, as well. They’ve moved to shut down a Republican primary, in order to protect Trump’s candidacy. Were Trump a strong candidate going into 2020, the party would not fear the voice of the voters, stepping up to present another candidate for consideration.

It’s something to think about, and if Elizabeth Warren is bringing it up, you can bet every other potential Democrat nominee is thinking about it, as well.

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