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So Why are We Celebrating Dr. King?

I remember a few years ago when the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. monument was dedicated in D.C. being amazed that they managed to create a memorial to honor an influential Baptist minister and somehow omit any reference to God or Jesus in the featured quotations and inscriptions.  Remember, this was “Reverend” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., after all. 

Some argued at the time that Biblical references were rejected because the memorial was to focus not on his work as a pastor, but rather as a civil rights crusader.  Of course, to Dr. King, the two were inseparable.  It was his faith in Jesus Christ, his belief in transcendent Moral Authority, and his allegiance to Divine Law that motivated his activism.  Not to mention that his civil rights speeches were peppered with Scriptural references as the justification for his positions. 

Take the famous “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” where King explained that, “A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law.”  The entire foundation for the King civil rights movement was predicated upon the existence of the Biblical God and His eternal justice. 

That doesn’t sit well in our modern, enlightened culture – just ask CNN anchor and noted leftist Chris Cuomo who recently drew a parallel between affirming Christian doctrine on sexuality and being a white supremacist.  That’s merely one example of the foolishness of progressive thought today; thought that is, in sharp contrast to Dr. King’s, predicated upon the non-existence of the Biblical God and His authority, as well as cultural acceptance of moral relativism. 

Which is why I should have been utterly unsurprised that in all the King tributes I read and watched yesterday from progressive sources, those who have hijacked King’s movement continue to ignore the driving force behind his noble cause: Christian morality.

The further removed we become from Dr. King’s ministry, the more aggressive the secular left becomes in turning him into a progressive social justice warrior.  Dr. King as he was is not good enough for them because it is increasingly obvious that is not who they are or want to be.  The only option left for the left then becomes either ignoring or tarnishing King’s legacy, or rewriting it.  They have opted for the latter. 

It’s why you saw them tie King’s activism to the morally repugnant riots of Occupy Wall Street a few years ago.  It’s why you still see them associate King’s silent prayer vigils on segregated streets with grown men prancing around American cities in tutus and G-strings, flinging pixie dust at pride parades.  King preached fidelity to Biblical morality, something eschewed by the sexual anarchists of the left.  It’s why as the left continues obsessing over the color of a man’s skin rather than focusing on the content of his character, Dr. King’s actual dream slips further and further beyond our grasp.

It stands to reason that if we invert our understanding of who King was, we will fail to achieve his lofty and admirable vision of racial harmony and brotherhood.  Call me crazy, but if that’s what we’re intent on doing as a society, why are we pretending to celebrate him?

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