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Fascist Google Has The Right To Be a Tyrant, But Bake That Cake, Bigot!

By  |  August 8, 2017, 03:00am  |  @stevengberman





So Google fired the employee who wrote a ten-page memorandum about workplace diversity.

In a memo to employees, Google CEO Sundar Pichai said the employee who penned a controversial memo that claimed that women had biological issues that prevented them from being as successful as men in tech had violated its Code of Conduct, and that the post had crossed “the line by advancing harmful gender stereotypes in our workplace.”

He added: “To suggest a group of our colleagues have traits that make them less biologically suited to that work is offensive and not OK.”

Okay. Note that Pichai didn’t say the memo-writer, identified by Bloomberg as James Demore, specifically claimed these traits make anyone “less suited.” He simply pointed out some things that “suggest” those conclusions, which the reader must draw. He wrote it by way of explanation of why there are less women in certain jobs.



Demore’s central point is that Google values viewpoint ideological lockstep over other forms of diversity. How you think, and your worldview, are more valuable to the company, which depends enormously on collaboration, than who you are.

In this, Demore is absolutely right. And Google has the perfect right to insist on this, as long as they don’t cross certain lines of religious discrimination. Demore’s own firing proves his own points. Disagree with fundamental go-along, get-alongs, and you find yourself on the wrong side of the Code of Conduct.

This is as it should be. Yonatan Zunger, a former Googler, wrote in response that he could not “in good conscience” assign an employee who wrote a memo like Demore’s to work with anyone in the group.

You have just created a textbook hostile workplace environment,” he wrote. He also said in a email, “Could you imagine having to work with someone who had just publicly questioned your basic competency to do your job?”

Google created its workplace, and by that statement, Zunger is correct. Nobody wants to work with a pariah who doesn’t get with the program.

Don’t get me wrong here: Google is being tyrannical to the point of fascist in its treatment of employees and viewpoint discrimination.

But Google has the right to be that way, for the sake of liberty, wouldn’t you agree?

Google is not the government (arguably, it rivals a government in the amount of data it has on you and me, down to the keystroke, or the temperature in my bedroom). Protections against viewpoint discrimination and free speech among hired employees don’t apply to every employer in America, or rather they shouldn’t.

Otherwise, we might have Christian organizations forced to hire atheists, or a major newsmagazine writing that “atheists aren’t the problem, Christian intolerance is the problem.” We might have Christian bakers forced to supply cakes to same-sex weddings against their consciences. We might have restaurants forced to hire those who don’t agree with the core principles guiding their business.

Because Google–and the left–claims a perfect right to police its own purity, but haughtily and pridefully the purity they seek is really poison that denies this right to everyone but themselves.

Welcome to the new work world. Choose a side.